Events

Are you interested in literary events? If so, please sign up below to receive invitations to Moe’s Books special happenings.

Although reading is a solitary activity it can often lead to essential public discussion. For this reason, Moe’s began curating literary events in the late nineties. Since then the “basement series” has become an important part of Bay Area literary culture. Poets and novelists, activists and scholars have been invited to talk about their work. Please join us for a lively and thoughtful conversation in our enormous scholarly bookstore.

If you are an author who'd like to be considered for a reading, please email owen@moesbooks.com.

All events, unless noted, start at 7:30pm

March 30: Poetry Flash presents Katherine Hastings and G. P. Skratz

April 6: Poetry Flash presents Lola Haskins and Carolyn Miller

April 12: Joyce Carol Oates

April 13: Poetry Flash presents Laura Hinton and Angela Hume

April 20: Poetry Flash presents Jan Beatty and Kendra Tanacea

April 27: Poetry Flash presents Deema K Shehabi and Lena Khalaf Tuffaha

 

March 30th: Poetry Flash presents Katherine Hastings and G. P. Skratz

170330.png

Katherine Hastings’s new book of poems is Shakespeare & Stein Walk Into a Bar. Annie Finch says, “Katherine Hastings’ poems play with consciousness on many levels. Nature, literature, and human experience catch memorably within the threads of their dense and startling webs.” Her two previous full-length collections are Nighthawks and Cloud Fire. A former poet laureate of Sonoma County, she is the curator of WordTemple Poetry Series and host of WordTemple on NPR affiliate KRCB FM.

G. P. Skratz’s new book of poems is Sundae Missile: the Mass of the Church of the Center that will not Hold, a homophonic translation of the “pre-Vatican Council Latin version” of the Roman Catholic Mass. Andrei Codrescu says, “Until they ever improve the wine and put some jam in the wafers, Catholics will have to be content with GP Skratz’ sound translation of the Mass. It doesn’t beat Bach but it would work for Sinatra.” His previous publications are The Gates of Disappearance and Fun, and Everything Else, co-authored with the late poet Darrell Gray, with drawings by Dave Morice and photographs by Shelly Vogel. With a long history as a poet-performer, he is probably most noted for his production of “The Actualist Conventions” with Darrell Gray, Jim Nisbet, and David Schein. He currently performs poetry and music with Arundo and “twisted roots” music with Smooth Toad.

April 6th: Poetry Flash presents Lola Haskins and Carolyn Miller

170406.png

Lola Haskins’s new book of poems is How Small, Confronting Morning. W. S. Merwin has said, “She writes with the startling freedom and grace of a kite flying, and with the variety and assurance of invention that reveal, in image after image, the dream behind the waking world.” She has published nine books of poetry, including The Grace to Leave and Still. Recently named Honorary Chancellor of the Florida State Poetry Association, she has also won the Iowa Poetry Prize, the Emily Dickinson prize from the Poetry Society of America, two Florida Book Awards, and two fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Carolyn Miller’s new book of poems is Route 66 and Its Sorrows. Philip Levine has said of her poems, “Their music and vocabulary draw their strength from the best that has endured in poetry in English from Wyatt to Williams, and while they are original, they are also as ordinary as bread or wine.” Her previous collections are After Cocteau and Light, Moving as well as four limited-edition letterpress chapbooks. Her poems have been featured on Poetry Daily and The Writer’s Almanac, and they have been anthologized in Garrison Keillor’s Good Poems, American Places, among other publications and honors.

April 12th: Joyce Carol Oates, A Book of American Martyrs

170412.png

Joyce Carol Oates is a recipient of the National Humanities Medal, the National Book Critics Circle Ivan Sandrof Lifetime Achievement Award, the National Book Award, and the PEN/Malamud Award for Excellence in Short Fiction. She has written some of the most enduring fiction of our time, including the national bestsellers We Were the Mulvaneys, Blonde (a finalist for the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize), and the New York Times bestsellers The Falls (winner of the 2005 Prix Femina Etranger) and The Gravedigger’s Daughter. She is the Roger S. Berlind Distinguished Professor of the Humanities at Princeton University.

In this striking, enormously affecting novel, Joyce Carol Oates tells the story of two very different and yet intimately linked American families. Luther Dunphy is a zealous evangelical who envisions himself as acting out God’s will when he assassinates an abortion provider in his small Ohio town, while Augustus Voorhees, the idealistic but self-regarding doctor who is killed, leaves behind a wife and children scarred and embittered by grief.

In her moving, keenly observed portrait, Joyce Carol Oates fully inhabits the perspectives of two interwoven families whose destinies are defined by their warring convictions and squarely—but with great empathy—confronts an intractable, abiding rift in American society. A Book of American Martyrs is a stunning, timely depiction of an issue hotly debated on a national stage but which makes itself felt most lastingly in communities torn apart by violence and hatred.

April 13th: Poetry Flash presents Laura Hinton and Angela Hume

170413.png

 

Laura Hinton’s new book of poems is Ubermütter’s Death Dance. Elizabeth Frost asks, “How do we survive grief—let alone write it? Shattered by the inexplicable death of her only child at 32, Laura Hinton miraculously gives us this lacerating work of witness, “am I still a mother?” she asks, refusing any answer…I feel privileged to read—to be—in these words.” She is a scholar, editor, literary critic, and multi-media poet. Among her many scholarly books is the edited collection Jayne Cortez, Adrienne Rich, and the Feminist Superhero: Voice, Vision, Politics and Performance in U.S. Contemporary Women’s Poetics. Her previous book of poems is Sisyphus My Love (To Record a Dream in a Bathtub). She maintains a blog on hybrid poetics, “Chant de la Sirene” (www.chantdelasirene.com). Her readings are performances, often including dance.

Angela Hume’s new full-length book of poems is Middle Time. Evelyn Reilly says, “Mid-stream, mid-era, mid-construction of the notion of an Anthropocene extending into a multitude of future absences, Hume is writing poetry that is both symptom and diagnosis. Querying vocabularies of mitigation, of damage, of ‘rage’s junk effects,’ these intelligent, visually and sonically acute fragments set forth an almost impossible lyric of a ‘possible earth capsizing toward you’ or, rather, us.” Widely published in literary journals, she is also the author of the chapbooks Melos, The Middle, and Second Story of Your Body.

April 20th: Poetry Flash presents Jan Beatty and Kendra Tanacea

170420.png

Jan Beatty’s new book is Jackknife: New and Selected Poems. David Trinidad says, “At the heart of Jan Beatty’s body of work is desire for recognition from the birth father, the artist in prisons and homeless shelters, tales of hardcore sex…One of our most fearless poets, Beatty tends to the monsters inside her. And we are all the better for it.” Her previous collections include The Switching/Yard, Red Sugar, Boneshaker, and Mad River, winner of the 1994 Agnes Lynch Starrett Prize. Her poems were anthologized in Best American Poetry 2013 and many other volumes. The managing editor of MadBooks, a small press publishing a series of books and chapbooks by women, for the past twenty years she has also hosted and produced Prosody, a public radio show on NPR affiliate WESA-FM, featuring the work of national writers. Among her honors are the Creative Achievement Award from the Heinz Foundation, an Artists Grant from The Pittsburgh Foundation, and the Pablo Neruda Prize for Poetry.

Kendra Tanacea’s debut book of poems is A Filament Burns in Blue Degrees. Amy Gerstler says, “The passions and quiet violences that bind us and drive us apart fuel these poems. Tanacea writes with uncluttered immediacy and incandescent candor about domesticity, drugs, family, memory, divorce, sex as spirituality, fertility, horses and more.” Her collection was a semifinalist for the Washington Prize and a finalist for the Idaho Prize for Poetry. She is an attorney in San Francisco.

 

 April 27th: Poetry Flash presents Deema K. Shehabi and Lena Khalaf Tuffaha

170427.png

Deema K. Shehabi is a Palestinian-American poet, writer, and editor. Author of the poetry collection Thirteen Departures from the Moon, she also collaborated with Marilyn Hacker in DIASPOR/RENGA, an email exchange between the two poets, of Palestinian and Jewish heritage respectively, sparked by the 2009 Israeli siege of Gaza, published as a single long poetic dialogue. Another of her collaborative publications is Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here, co-edited with Beau Beausoleil for which she won the Northern California Book Reviewers Special Recognition Award.

An American poet of Palestinian, Jordanian and Syrian heritage, Lena Khalaf Tuffaha’s debut book of poems is Water & Salt. Oliver de La Paz says, “The poems in Water & Salt are fearless and frank. They speak of a place where a phone call announces doom and where ‘portraits find their frames.’ But always, despite the violence and war, in the music of Tuffaha’s poetry there is a clear summons, beckoning us to join her in the feast of her language.” Widely published in literary journals, she is also the winner of the 2016 Two Sylvias Chapbook Prize for Arab in Newsland.

0-events4.jpg